Official site of artist Mayumi Oda

In Ancient City of Nara, traditional craftsman Mr. Yoshihara practicing old method of mounting paint with Japanese silk fabric from Kyoto. He is corroborating with Mayumi’s work in his studio since year 2012. Mr. Yoshimura is last few skilled craftsman of Kakejiku art.

From Wikipedia

Kakejiku is a Japanese scroll painting or calligraphy mounted usually with silk fabric edges on a flexible backing, so that it can be rolled for storage.

As opposed to makimono, which are meant to be unrolled laterally on a flat surface, a kakemono is intended to be hung against a wall as part of the interior decoration of a room. It is traditionally displayed in the tokonoma alcove of a room especially designed for the display of prized objects. When displayed in a chashitsu, or teahouse for the traditional tea ceremony, the choice of the kakemono and its complementary flower arrangement help set the spiritual mood of the ceremony. Often the kakemono used for this will bear calligraphy of a Zen phrase in the hand of a distinguished Zen master.

The kakemono was introduced to Japan during the Heian period, primarily for displaying Buddhist images for religious veneration, or as a vehicle to display calligraphy or poetry. From the Muromachi period, landscapes, flower and bird paintings, portraiture, and poetry became the favorite themes.

The “Maruhyōsō” style of kakejiku has four distinct named sections. The top section is called the “ten” heaven. The bottom is the “chi” earth with the “hashira” pillars supporting the heaven and earth on the sides. The maruhyōsō style, (not pictured above) also contains a section of “ichimonji” made from “kinran” gold thread.[1] On observation, the Ten is longer than the Chi. This is because in the past, Kakemono were viewed from a kneeling (seiza) position and provided perspective to the “Honshi” main work. This tradition carries on to modern times.[2]

There is a cylindrical rod called jikugi (軸木) at the bottom, which becomes the axis or center of the rolled scroll. The end knobs on this rod are in themselves called jiku, and are used as grasps when rolling and unrolling the scroll.[3]

Other parts of the scroll include the “jikubo” referenced above as the jikugi. The top half moon shaped wood rod is named the “hassō” to which the “kan” or metal loops are inserted in order to tie the “kakehimo” hanging thread. Attached to the jikubo are the “jikusaki”, the term used for the end knobs, which can be inexpensive and made of plastic or relatively decorative pieces made of ceramic or lacquered wood. Additional decorative wood or ceramic pieces are called “fuchin” and come with multicolored tassels. The variation in the kakehimo, jikusaki and fuchin make each scroll more original and unique.[4][5]